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Us 11, Ashleigh 4, David Bowie 4, Florida 4, Tucson 4, Usaa 3, Gabby Giffords 3, Cnn 3, America 3, Jack Hanna 2, Obama 2, Bowie 2, Ocuvite 2, Barber 2, Alex Jones 2, Uganda 2, United States 2, Connecticut 2, Texas 2, India 2,
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  CNN    CNN Newsroom    News/Business. Latest on the day's top news stories  
   with a focus on global news, trends and destinations. New.  

    January 8, 2013
    8:00 - 9:00am PST  

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talk back question today -- why are we hooked on violence on screen? this is from ann. i would say they're fascinated by the idea of how in the world does someone think of such crimes? this is from raymond. how will we allow two beloved children's stories into action violence movie? although, raymond, if you've ever read the real grimm fairy tales, those things were violent and scary violent. i made the mistake of reading them as the child. this from stephen. and this from claudio -- because it's fun to watch and it's not real. the people getting killed are actors, the blood is cornstarch dyed red. nothing about it is real and should not be taken too seriously. please keep the conversation going. facebook me or tweet me, and
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thank you, as always for watches "catherines in room" continues with ashleigh banfield. gb gb says enough. that's her response to the slaughter of 26 people in newtown countering krk countering in an interview with abc news. that's why givers, alongside hell astronaut husband mark kelly are launching this, a political action committee and website, aimed at curbing gun violence. it's called americans for responsible for solutions. on the website, they say they're going to try to raise money -- enough money necessarily to, quote, balance the influence of the gun lobby, end quote. you might remember it was two years ago today that a gunman shot at gabby giffords. and shot her in the head. this was during a tucson political event where six people were killed, 12 others were
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wounded. one of the people wounded was ron barber, gifford's aide. he was elected to fill her seat on capitol hill and is kind enough to join us by telephone now. thanks so much for being with us today. i really appreciate this. could you lay out more for me about this new initiative? >> good morning. i'm sorry. i wasn't able to hear you well. could you say that again? >> sure, congressman barber, give me a few more fuller details about gabby giffords and her husband's news initiative they are laying out today? >> from what i understand, their goal is to engage the country in a reasonable and rational conversation about gun violence and how it might be prevented in the future. and also to do what they can do raise public awareness about the issue. so i welcome what they're doing.
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i think it's important that we have more and more people involved. i've seen a groundswell of interest in this issue, particularly since the shootings in connecticut. it affected all of us deeply certainly affected me as a grandparent, and seeing behind them my grandchildren's faces. to me it's important that we finally move from talking about the issue to actually taking some appropriate act. i'm going to be involved with that in congress as a member of a task force that seeks to end or stop gun violence. >> apart from the politics involved, there's money, a lot of money involved. critics say the nra is almost too powerful to go up against. so they're feeling somewhat powerless against that big of a lobby group. to me it seems this is where the
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targets might lie, to try to raise enough money to go head to head, but is that really possible? >> well, i think it is possible, and you're right, money does maic a difference in communicating information and getting a message out. for my part, as a member of the congressional task force. i'm planning on reintroducing, actually, a piece of legislation that i introduced last session, specifically having to do with mental health issues, which i think is a huge part of the concern we have dealing with here. i formed a mental health task force back here at tucson. at every level, i believe, local state and federal officials, elected officials must engage the people they serve. as a second amendment supporter, i boulevard there's a right to bear arms, as confirmed by the supreme court, but i believe there have to be some limits. the assault weapon that was used to shoot 19 of us in tucson within 45 seconds, killing six really good people, my colleague gabe zimmerman and christina
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taylor green, we have to act, for the mental health side and we have to do what we can to limit or eliminate access to these high-powered assault weapons and the high-capacity magazines that allowed so many people to be shot in such a short period of time. >> let me ask you this, as powerful as the nra is, it is not easy to fight gabby giffords. she has an enormous amount of support not only among her former congressmen, but across the country as well. she does elicit a lot of country, do you they they could work that to their advantage, how do you go up against gabby giffords and fight what she's doing? >> the congresswoman, as you point out is not only a national inspiration to all of us, but actually has a worldwide image that's very positive, and certainly her engaging as well as mark engaging, it will help a
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lot. you know, there are a lot of nra members in this country. we have significant evidence to suggest that they're not all opposed, in fact there may well be a majority in favors of limitations on the assault weapon availability. let me just give you a story from a visit i have in wilcox, arizona, a small community, a rural community down to the south of tucson near the border. i was down there for a meeting on a day the children were killed in connecticut. as i was leaving the meeting, an 80-year-old farmer who's been generations in the business of farming chile down there said i've a lifelong member, i've had a gun since i was a boy, and i love to hundred, but ron, you have to go back to congress and do something about the assault weapons. i take that as an example of perhaps many, many more nra members who feel differently.
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this is not about taking away people's guns, but preventing mass shootings, and doing so through mental health services and reducing access to the assault weapons and the high-capacity magazines. >> congressman barber, i hope you're doing well. how is your health? >> i'm doing well. my leg below the knee is without nerves. that's not likely to tang, but i feel invigorated to be a member of congress, honored to be serving my community. now that this is a new issue, an important new issue that i'm engaged in and look forward to having some success with my colleagues. >> congressman thanks for being with us, my best to you. >> mea pleasure. thank you. >> lately it's become pretty clear that a fair number of people who passionately defend the second amendment, defend it with very little regard for the first amendment.
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that's the right to free speech. i want to be very specific here. more than 100,000 people signed this petition on the white house website to deport a friend of mine, a guy i work with here at cnn, piers morgan, and they're taking aim because he has very strong, he wants background checks, mental health treatment and more control over assault weapon sales. since newtown especially, he's been making that position clear again and again. last night. piers tried to have a conversation, a conversation with a talk show host who spearhead that had position to kick him out of this country. i want to show you how that conversation went. >> why do you want to deport me? >> we did it as a way to bring attention to the affect that we have all of these foreigners and the russian government, the official chinese government, mao said political power goes out of
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the barrel of the gun. he was the only one with the guns. we did it to point out this is globalism, and the banks that claim december brag they're going to get or guns as well. they've taken everybody's guns but the swiss and the american people. while the government buys 1.6 billion bullets predator drones arms, being used to arrest people in north dakota. ed second amendment isn't there for duck hunting. it's there to protect us from tie ran cal government and street thugs. take the women in india, your piece earlier i was watching. it didn't tell you that the women of india have signed giant petition to get firearms, because the police can't and won't protect them. the answer is -- and i have fbi crime statistics that come out a year late, 2011, 20-plus percent
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crime crime, real violent crime because more guns means less crime. britain took the guns, true we have a higher gun violence left, about overall muggings, stabbings death, those women raped that women to debt with an iron rod four feet long. the tie rants did it. hitler took the guns, stalin took the guns, mao tonight the guns, hugo chavez took the guns and i'm here to tell you 1776 will commence again if you try to take you're firearms. we will not relinquish them. do you understand? that's why you're going to fail and the establishment knows no st. no matter home propaganda, the public will rise against. my family and the texas revolution against santa ana, my family was at the core of both sides starting that, because
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santa ana came to take the guns at gonzalez, texas, piers, why don't you come to america, i'll take you out shooting, you can become an american and join the republic. a very long answer to question question, which is why do you want to deport me? i'm still not sure why we got the -- but the man, hi, piers. >> hey, how are you? >> i'm okay. i want to ask how are you? that was quite an interview, and i'm curious what you think the takeamp is for everyone who was watching? >> well, honestly he's not trending worldwide on twitter and has been for pretty much since the show went out, and i can't think of a better advertisement for gun control than alex jones' intervow last night. it was startling, it was terrifying in parts. it was completely deluded. it was based on a premise of making americans so fearful that
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they all rushed out to buy even more guns. it showed no compassion whatsoever to the victims of gun shootings, and, you know, the kind of twisted way that he turned everything into this assault on the second amendment is exactly what the gun rights lobby people do. it's a lie. it cannot be allowed to continue. they have to be confronted and challenged occasionally, as with last night, i think silence was the best weapon against him. because he just gun himself an ever bigger hole. the general reaction has been one of real horror, that somebody with such a voice, a platform as alex jones. he has millions who listen to his show, and he spouts 24 dangerous nonsense. >> at the same time there are a lot of people, as you mentioned, who do listen to him and do agree and are fearful that someone is going to take their guns away. i know you really couldn't get a
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word in edgewise. i watched it live last night. i wanted to hear your point that you were making. what is your point -- and do you think and supporters of yours think that all guns should be taken away from americans? >> no. look, i honestly believe the way to remove any murder is to remove all guns, but that's not a practical solution. there are 300 million guns in circulation, you never will get them out of the circulation, so you have tore realistic in the goals and what you're trying to achieve. what i've noticed being there on cnn, it will be two years next week, there's been a proliferation in the scale of mass shootings, sort of horribly familiar pattern of deranged young men in particular getting their hachbts on the ar-15 military style weapons and committing these terrible outrageous -- ultimate aurora movie theater sheeting was the
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biggest shooting by a single shooter in the history of the united states. in a few months the biggest shooting at a school in the history of the united states. yet the reaction is a week or two of mourning, a bit of chatter about gun control, and then america goes back to normal. meantime -- >> actually piers, there's one more reaction. a lot of people go out and they actually purchase assault weapons fearing there will be an outright ban. >> this is my real problem. i have absolute respect for any american who wants to exercise their rights under the second amendment to of a firearm at home, a pistol or handgun to protect themselves article their families. there are numerous incidents where that potentially has saved a right. i think that's what the founding fathers probably intended. however, i see no reason, and i come from a military family, many of my relatives have served in the british army.
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they are as aghast as i am, i can go to walmart and i'm not allow to do buy six packets of pseudofed or various types of french cheese, because they're considered too harmful to my health, but i can buy an a ref-15, buy 6,000 rounds of ammunition on the internet, i can buy a magazine to hold 100 bullets and then go to a church or school or movie theater or shopping mall and kill as many americans as i want to in the space of a few minutes. this madness has to stop. if it makes me unpopular, it's about time. american's politicians have you cowered into a shameful silence. >> that's where i want to go next. i literally am out of time, but i have to go there next. the white house responded to this petition to have you kicked out of. they have to respond to this.
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this isn't a joke. what did they say? >> jay carney, the white house spokesman said two things, one they would be making a formal response, so president obama will decide whether i'm going to be deported or not, but i thought there was a clue to that decision-making process, which said they wanted to remind people they respect the right of freedom of expression, which is of course a constitutional right under the first amendment. about people who want to deport me for supposedly attacking the second amendment, which that's a flagrant -- the freedom of speech expression particularly with the press. it's noted there. i think that this debate has to be had the it has to continue, it cannot be allow to do die just because a story fades out after a couple weeks. there will be another mass shooting in america, and we
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knows this. the answer to sandy hook is not to do nothing. that's a moral and ethical -- >> i'm flat out time. but i cannot wait for tonight's program, because i know you have more coming. piers, thanks for talking to me. >> thanks, ashleigh. >> i said it, tune in tonight, because he has the fallout. it starts at 9:00 p.m. eastern right here on cnn. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve.
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this is day 2 of the preliminary hearing. it will begin with continued testimony from a detective who has been detailing the injuries to many of the dozens of victims from that shooting last july. other testimony so day 1 was very, very graphic. police officers testified about the bloody scene that they encountered, one officer saying some of the victims he carried out of the theater were so badly injured, he could not determine either their race or their gender. also talked about the number of victims he took to the hospital, trips back and forth, and by the time he was through, he could
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hear blood sloshing in the back of his patrol car. very, very graphic testimony, very difficult for members of the victims' family to here despite the fact they were warned by prosecutors in advance of the hearing. also the first officer who placed holmes under arrest said about his emotion at state after the shooting, quote, he was very relaxed. there were not normal emotional responses to anything. he seems very detached. obviously that will be capitalized on by the defense to show he had some sort of diminished or impairing mental capacity. family members of some of the victims, though, are not buying it. >> i never stopped watching him in the courtroom. as soon as he saw different things happening, he smiled,
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very quickly, he caught himself. he's pretending to be crazy. he's evil, but there's no way he's crazy. >> reporter: surveillance video that showed him entering the theater, using his cell phone to gain admission. it was learned at the hearing he purchased his tickets 12 days in advance of the showing, which the prosecution can clearly use to show evidence of premeditati premeditation. ashleigh? >> casey, thank you. the preliminary hearing is expected to continue throughout the week. we do have a team of reporters outside of courtroom action and we'll bring you the latest.
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so what are you doing on
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february 15th? my advice is get a helmet action because we're running out of money on that today possibly. we as a government will no longer be able to pay our bills. christine romans, what do we do about this? >> well, you have to raise the debt ceiling. by law congress can only spend so much money and rack up so much debt. we hit that ceiling on february 15th according to the policy center. on that day, the inflow into the treasury coffers, $9 billion. imagine this like your own checkbook. on that day you have $52 bill chron in bills due. >> we've got a big -- >> so break that down for me. in that set of bills, what's due that day? >> well, the biggest part of that committed spending is $30 billion interest on our debt.
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we have to pay the interest, or we are in default of our obligations. we borrow money every day just to run the country as it is. >> just look at that top picture you have about 30 billion would be the mortgage payment and all of those littler numbers would be the expenses. >> these are things that people wee lie on. it's a friday, it's payday, so federal salaries and ben felts. medicare and medicate, defense vendors going paid on the 15th. these are things that in theory, if you don't raise the debt ceiling, the government could have to give you an iou instead of money. >> obviously this is a serious problem, because if they just stop paying these people, it's not just these people who are feated, it's all of us. explain the domino effect. >> imagine if suddenly you have
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43 billion that used to be in the economy that day that isn't, right? so retailers, it's hotels, it's food and drink establishments, it's cars being bought. it's all these things that don't happen in the economy while they wait for the money they're used to. the baseline is you're spending that much more than you earn. >> could we get downgraded? >> they've warned it could happen quickly. you could have a stock market decline, it could hurt your 401(k). if this happens, it sends a signal to the world that our congress is absolutely dysfunctional, that we're going to make promises or government can't keep. >> so a lot of people said i thought we hit that debt ceiling and ran out of money on december 31st, and then there were extraordinary measures -- >> do you move things among accounts? >> why can't i have
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extraordinary measures. >> we've been doing it do the tune of -- you can't keep moving around in the accounts after february 15th. it's a big fat ending. >> all right. that tells you why it's as serious as it is. we'll obviously be talking about this more as the politicians try to figure it out. e is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. is the only yogurt brand endorsed by weight watchers and your taste buds have always endorsed us. so, you know what this means... this is a real win win! yoplait, it is so good.
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making serious ripples. joining us is jack hanna, the greater guy to do it. host of "jack hanna's into the wild." this is such a cool discovery. this was like the holy grail. why is it such a big deal? >> they've actually seen them, not very much. i remember "20,000 leagues under the sea" when that squid grabbed the submarine? it scared me to death. i'm seen some squid, but if i saw a giant squid -- will well, i wouldn't be at 600 feet but this animal has eyes as big as a plate, ten feet long, can you imagine that? they can grow to 30 feet.
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i think i would kiss myself good-bye. >> what they found is ten feed long, but missing the two main tentacles. if you extrapolate, this little baby is probably closer to 26 feet long. is it because they're almost extinct, because they just dwell at such depths, we don't typically mine those areas for research? >> exactly. there are none in zoos, by the way throughout the world. there's other types of squid in aquariums, but remember the gorilla in uganda, he was only discovered in 1905, because they live in these real harsh rain forests in uganda and rwanda, in the congo. >> oh, no, jack, can you hear us? you froze up for a second, so i
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lost the last part of your audio, after you talked about the gorilla. >> can you hear me? >> now i've got you back. you. >> all right. the mountain gorillas were only discovered in 1905, and they're over 45 pounds. this animal is the same thing. thee very shy, they live in the dark, with no night to expos them. this was done baas they guys just happened to come up with with that type of light. so kind of like the mountain gorilla. these giant squids could not live in a park because of depth, the pressure, all sorts of things, the lighting, so in our world they'll be in the natural world and hope they can survive -- they don't know that much about them. >> one that is question about the significant of finding it, other than it is extremely school. did it tell us anything about
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with rather to marine science? what kind of information is this going to yield to us? >> we find out what they eat. we know a few things about them, yes, but one of the -- when i traveled all over the world, we have discovered many things. there are still a few things not discovered, but the oceans of the world, there's no telling what's down there. that's what's so exciting about this what's after this? that's what's so exciting about the ocean. it's like space. we don't know what's up there. sail thing with the ocean. the land, we have sensors, we can sense heat with animals on the ground, it's a much different situation. >> very cool, and i think you have very good -- i think i misspoke about the shows. it's into the wild and --i great
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to have you. >> if i find one, i'll call you. please do. take me with you.
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president obama is promises to make gun control a big part of his second term, but did you know the centerpiece of his first term, obama care, also contains a little known item about guns. actually bans doctors and others
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from collecting data about their patients' firearms used. this was put in by the national rifle association, at least they lobbied for it. it doesn't affect you. dr. sanjay gupta has been digging through this. normally i don't call for you political stories, sanjay, but it does involve you. it just seems an odd match. >> as you said, ashleigh, the nra does take credit for this. saying they did lobby hard to get this relatively small provision put into the bill, ultimately put in by senator reid basically it doe not prohibit doctors asking patients about guns, but it does the other things you mention, it prevents them from writing it down, charting it, collecting it for the purpose of research, being part of wellness programs. you talk to the nra about it,
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they'll say this information keg used to discrimination people in terms of raising their insurance premiums, though there's been no history of that. people on the other side say this is how we develop safety programs with regard to guns. we need this information, this data to make guns safer. so there's the rub. there is shall provision as you point out specifically about guns and health. so as a doctor you could ask me, ashleigh do you have a gun? and i can tell you, but you can't write it down. can't be transmitted, can't be given to others doctors. you can have the conversation, but it could be used to the larger purposes of research. florida as well as seven other states want to do precisely what you're saying as well. they actually -- the governor, saying, in florida has said the simple asking about guns should also be illegal. in fact, that's what was suggested by the governor.
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that was subsequently overturned by a federal judge in florida saying it absolutely has to be part of the conversation, but that's being appealed. so there's a lot of passion on both sides. >> wouldn't the -- trump the state law in that respect, even if the repeal does pass and ultimately florida does get what they're seeking and governor scott gets what he's seeking, which is you may not even ask me about the weapon. >> there are state provisions especially with regard to medicaid patients, which may be paid in part by state funding, if not now, then ultimately. it's unclear, and why some states could be treated differently than others. >> how do doctors and your colleagues, how are you handling this? how are you practicing it? >> just a personal aneck dote, i had my physical exam and i was asked about guns, keeping guns in the household. i have three small children, so it was in the context of that
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discussion, but it was in the context of swimming pool, knowing if you have a swimming pool or not, how best to keep your kids safe. so i think doctors as a general rule consider this a public health issue. i talked to a lot of doctors about this, but take a look at some of the numbers overall. 2008, 2009, children and teens killed and a lot more injured as well. so in the same way you ask about smoke detectors, swimming pooling, doctors have asked about guns, especially with that bottom line there, younger children. third leading cause for death? i think people would be very surprised to hear that. sanjay, i know you have more on your in-depth interview this is week skrend, so i'll give you a big plug, 4:30 p.m. eastern time sunday morning at 7:30 as well.
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discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications, especially insulin, corticosteroids, or medicines to decrease blood clotting. so...what do men do when a number's too low? turn it up! [ male announcer ] in a clinical study, over 80% of treated men had their t levels restored to normal. talk to your doctor about all your symptoms. get the blood tests. change your number. turn it up. androgel 1.62%.
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gadget overload. really? you can't have too many, can you? not in you're here. day one of the 2013 consumer electronics show, which means a bunch of people in vegas are getting to preview very cool and very new high-tech phones, tvs, cameras and other stuff. dan simon is one of the lucky
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people who gets the preview. first thing i want to ask you about, there's something you found that will help me stop eating so much so fast. what is it? >> reporter: we're going to show you that in a second. first the lay of the law. ces gets under way in about an hour from now. 150,000 people will come through here over the next couple days. it would be impossible to canvass this entire area. 1.8 million square feet of gadgetry. we're in the health section. where we find this first company, gaining a lot of buzz here at ces. it's called the happy fork. as you said, it's something that will help people lose weight. fabrice buton is from france. we know the french fair thafr football. >> it's very important.
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we believe 50% of your health is nutrition. >> reporter: this is the force. this is an electronics forks it has batteries inside and tracks how you eat. the real selling point, is if you're eating too fast, it's going to buzz or light up and tell you to slow down, right? >> you have a gentle vibration, you see when you have the finger here,ist the sam as when i, then if i do it so fast, there's a slight vibration. one of them is the time you start eating. the second is the number of fork servings you do during each meal. the third is the interval. so every time i bring the food to my mouth, if i do it too fast
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that would be the gentle vie braggs. so i bring some food, right? >> hurry up, dan, do it faster, let's see what happens. >> within ten seconds. >> now. >> it buzzes, it vibrates. >> reporter: this is vibrating. how can people get their hands on this? >> this is available in febru y february. what is interesting in 2006, there was a study in the united states showing that people eating more slowly eat 11% less calories. so that's why eating slowly is important. you can lose weight. the digestion will be much better. >> reporter: i love it. the hapifork.
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>> tell fabrice he's slimmed because he's having salmon, right and vegetables. it may not have anything to do with his fork. >> reporter: she's saying maybe it's because of the salmon and the vegetables. >> few tries is important, yes. >> reporter: we're going to be at ces for the next couple days showing you innovative technologies. this is one of many products we'll be features. >> awesome. i cannot wait to see the rest. dan simon is live for us in vegas. go to cnn.com/tech -- no, wait cnn.com/tech -- i just feel terrible that i said that and he actually repeated it. we'll be back after the break. at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your progress-oh! story on facebook.
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♪ ♪ rebel, rebel hot tramp i love you so♪ >> so this is one of my favorite songs. i don't know if you remember this or not, depends how old you are, but this is david bowie belting out "rebel, rebel" and the awesome technology of the '70s in '74. if you think that lady gaga is the most outrageous singer today, i'm sorry, eye patch and
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spiky orange mullet, that was awesome stuff. he was so out front with his antics long before gaga or anybody else of her ilk was even born. take a peek-see at this. ♪ not space odd did, just odd. but this is new bowie, folks, his first new sing until ten years. it's called "where are we now" and it's coming on his 66th birthday. david bowie's 66. here to talk about this with me is showbiz tonight anchor a.j. hammer. am i nerding out because i love bowie to much. >> no. you ask do you remember "rebel, rebel "s it gets played on classic rock radio everywhere today.
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everybody, no matter your age, you've heard bowie. >> "let's dance." calling that out this morning. we were all calling out our favorites. why has this been so long? i realized, how, it has been a long time. >> ten years. it's his 66th birthday. how perfect is he releasing the music today. he hasn't talked about why he's taking a break. active until 2006. you might remember after the end of the last tour 2004 he had heart surgery. that took him out of play for a little while. and he hasn't been releasing anything. it's understandable that he wasn't producing new music. >> he looks so good. >> looks terrific. >> he's 66. look at him. looks incredible. >> yeah. it's interesting to see what happens with the new single, the new album. as far as my musicology can tell last time he had a single chart in the united states was back in the 1980s. >> oh lord. >> now we have digital downloads, it's going to change.
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we'll see what happens with the album. >> quickly, people who say, you, lady gaga, madonna, so avant-garde. think about it, david bowie was the first bizarre glam rocker who may have been the genesis for the ideas. >> the one who broke out, '70s, glam rock was going on and brought it to new heights and so many artists, particularly lady gaga credited david bowie. she used to put his makeup on, take it off, put it on, take it off. influential on what she did. >> cyndi lauper, people thought it was unique to dye your hair. look at her now. all taming down. now the new edge to be tame and look, you know -- >> demure. >> a.j., good to see you. back in a moment.
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one of the teenagers who was featured on a web video mocking a girl at the center of an ohio rape case now, quote, regrets his behavior and his comments, end quote. in case you don't remember the video, here's part of it. >> what if that was your daughter. >> but it isn't. >> what if it was? >> if that was my daughter i wouldn't care, i'd let her be dead. >> i'm listen to myself fine.
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>> michael nodianos' attorney says he did something dumb but did not commit a crime. two 16-year-olds charged with rape, among other thing but not that young man. yes, that is revolting discussion. does he face any kind of exposure legally for comments like that? >> ashleigh, the answer is no. why? you have a right to be despicable, disgusting, off-color, a right to make comments that are insensitive, rude and that people would deem to be totally inappropriate. the issue is whether it exposes you to any criminality. the answer is no. even on the web side the jurisdiction put up, the police said, look, this is offensive, we looked aat it, investigated it but find no criminality. >> i want to talk about the photo at center of the case that has gone viral. it shows two young men who now their attorneys have admitted
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they are at the center of the photo, holding the ankles and the wrists of what appears to be a limp girl. >> oh boy. >> one of the attorneys for the two young men said it's out of context. you don't know what the circumstance is. she may have been play acting along these lines. however, there's testimony that may refute this or at least support the fact that that's just an unconscious girl being hauled around to a couple of different parties in which alleged rapes occurred. the ohio attorney general's office released testimony from three eyewitnesss in the case. >> yes. >> they said they saw this girl stumbling and vomiting and ev t eventually unconscious. one of the witnesses said this. trent mays was holding her by her hands and malik ma'lik richmond was holding her by her feet. the question is, how did they get out of the basement that way and the answer, investigators got, they just -- they carried her out through the door out into the street.